Pumpkin Glow

The lawn of Fuller Lodge is filled with the eerie, flickering glow of hundreds of carved pumpkins lit for the annual Los Alamos Pumpkin Glow. In past years, well over 1,000 people have gazed in wide wonder at glowing visions of scary creatures, funny faces, cute animals, and fancy flowers. We encourage people of all ages and artistic talent to participate. Everyone can carve a pumpkin!  The annual Pumpkin Glow is generally held the Saturday before Halloween in conjunction with other Trick-or-Treat on Main Street events.

2013 Festival

Pumpkin Glow will be held Saturday, October 26, 2013 in collaboration with Trick or Treat on Main Street which will be held on October 25. Pumpkin artists drop off their jack-o-lanterns in the afternoon and return after dark to view the hundreds of glowing gourds. Participants can pick up their pumpkins after the event (or choose from the unclaimed works of art). The Pumpkin Glow will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

As part of the “Halloweekend”  the student Masquerade Recital will be held Saturday, October 26 at 4 p.m. just before the Pumpkin Glow in Fuller Lodge. Costumed music students will play some eerie selections.

Pumpkin Glow Gallery — Click to enlarge:

Pumpkin Glow Tips

To make the most of your pumpkin carving experience, consider hosting your own carving party. A wide rage of carving patterns are available on the Internet and in home magazines for anyone interested in carving something more than standard triangle-nosed, gap-tooth jack. We suggest investing a couple of dollars in a simple pumpkin carving kit available at most grocery stores and discount retailers. The thin, child-safe pumpkin saws included in most kits make carving much easier.

Selecting and Carving a Pumpkin
• Decide on your design before selecting a pumpkin. Choose a pumpkin that is smooth as possible as free of scratches, dents, or gouges (unless you plan to incorporate these into your finished design.
• Draw your design on paper first. Transfer your design to the pumpkin by poking holes through the paper with a thumb tack to trace out the design.
•You can make the pattern of transferred dots easier to see on the pumpkin by rubbing flour into them. The flour will fill the holes and turn them white.
• To make sharp corners, always remove your saw completely and reinsert it at a different angle.
• To remove cut pieces, push them out from the inside with your finger or a poker. Cut
larger pieces into smaller chunks to make removal easier and avoid damage to your design.
• Toothpicks are great for adding extra features like ears and noses.
• As you cut the lid, bevel the cut so the lid will stay on. Cut one or two holes in the lid to allow the candle smoke to rise straight up.

Preserving your Pumpkin
• Washing the inside of you pumpkin with a mild bleach solution will slow the process of
decay.
• Coat the cut surfaces of your pumpkin with petroleum jelly to seal in water and make
your jack-o’-lantern last longer.
•To prevent mold, spray or rub the inside and cut surfaces with diluted lemon juice.
If you really want to make your creations last, put them in a plastic bag and store in the refrigerator when not on display. When pumpkins shrivel, it’s because they have lost moisture. You can usually restore them back to their original condition by soaking them in water overnight